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no mention of large spring clocks
In General Discussion
My first build of Steve Peterson’s Coup Perdu Clock is finished and running.
In Printed Clocks
Coup Perdu First Prototype
In General Discussion
Coup Perdu Clock complete
In Printed Clocks
Steve
Nov 11, 2022
Hi Chris, Thanks for posting photos. Most of the noise in the Coup Perdu comes from the escapement rotating, then coming to a stop when it hits the pallet. The Coup Perdu collects all the energy from the complete pendulum swing and concentrates it into a single loud tick. A smaller low energy escapement would have less noise. This clock does that to a limited extent by adding an extra gear to allow the escapement to only have 12 teeth. It is hard to make it much smaller unless it could be machined in brass. The Coup Perdu seems to need a larger pendulum swing than the deadbeat, so it is difficult to reduce the escapement energy and still have a functional clock. The deadbeat version of the clock is a lot quieter than the Coup Perdu. My non-scientific measurements are around 10dB quieter. There are more ticks, but each has less energy. The escapement still has 12 teeth, but the overall diameter is slightly smaller. It looks like you have already printed the deadbeat version of the clock. Unfortunately, I do not know how to make the deadbeat escapement any quieter. Placing it on a wooden desk can sometimes amplify the sound, so you might try some dampening underneath. The tolerances around the clock face are around 0.5mm. I found it to work pretty good in my printer without additional sanding. Of course, there are many tolerances to account for like extrusion multiplier, filament tolerances, etc. The 32 day clock has 0.625mm tolerances which can get a bit sloppy in a clock with a second hand and an additional gear in the stack passing through the frame. Maybe I should loosen them up a bit. Steve
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Coup Perdu Clock Second Prototype
In Printed Clocks
Electric Rewind on 32 Day Pendulum Clock
In General Discussion
Steve
Nov 04, 2022
Great question. The 32 day clock is a good starting point since the entire left side is dedicated to winding the clock. Gear 7 rotates the correct direction for a weight hanging off the left side. The Coup Perdu hangs the drive weight on a gear with a 24 minute rotation. It rewinds every 3-4 minutes. The 32 day clock has a 7 day mode with the ratchet slowed down by a 28 tooth gear driving the 38 tooth ratchet. This gives it an 81.4 minute rotation. Theoretically it would need 3.4 times as much drive weight. This is still a manageable amount of weight. The Coup Perdu motor has a 20 tooth pinion. This could be reduced to an 8 or 12 tooth pinion to lessen the load on the motor. Alternatively, are there other motors that might work: Clayton Boyer's motor is physically a lot larger than the N20 motor. The no load current is about the same at 30mA. The loaded current is about double (80mA vs 40mA), but still within the safe range of the reed switch with a 500mA rating. It is a 12V motor that seems to require at least 5V to operate, so the clock would need 4 batteries. This motor https://www.ebay.com/itm/322698617243 falls between Clayton Boyer's motor and the N20 motor. It is a good size. The current is only 15mA no load and 30mA loaded, so it is lower than the N20. It also needs at least 5V to operate. Total power would be about the same as using the N20. I am a bit concerned about availability. The N20 motors are really popular. This motor might only have one good source with limited supply. They get really expensive if you have to buy them new. Steve
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Steve

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